How Effective Are Veggie Washes? Do They Really Help?

How Effective Are Veggie Washes? Do They Really Help?

orange, red, and yellow capsicum

How Effective Are Veggie Washes? Do They Really Help?

Fruit and vegetable washes help clean the dirt, germs and waxes on the surface of fresh produce. Read on to know more about these veggie washes.

Washing fresh produce the moment we come back home and organizing it in the fridge is not unheard of. Now even more so, due to the pandemic. Fruits and vegetables with hard skins like apples and cucumbers are washed rigorously while the ones with soft peels and squishy textures like berries, peaches, and herbs are washed gently.

Let’s have a look at how to wash fruits and vegetables. Is clean water enough? If not, what are our options to wash the dirt and residues off the produce? Are veggie washes needed? Read on!

Did you know that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) roughly estimated that about 48 million people get sick from eating contaminated food every year?

is a veggie wash effective
Veggie Washes – What are they and why should you use them?

Veggie Washes – What Are They | Why Should You Use Them| How To Use Them

Fresh produce is handled by a lot of people before we finally bring them home to consume. There are a lot of germs and dirt that are stuck to the surface of the fruits and vegetables which must be washed away before consumption to avoid any food-related sickness. Even though most of us wash our produce under running water, veggie washes are the new entrant in the market that help up clean the fresh produce. Veggie washes are formulated to easily take off the dirt, germs, pesticides, and waxy residues on the surface of fresh produce without affecting the taste or texture.

Most veggies wash products available in the market are free of any perfumes, chlorine, and preservatives. They naturally clean your fresh produce and make them safe for consumption. Please read the labels of the product to know more.

To use a veggie wash, follow the instructions on the label of the brand you are using. If no instructions are given, dilute a spoonful of veggie wash in a 1-liter bowl of water. Soak the vegetables and fruits in that solution for about 15-30 minutes. Increase the quantity of water and veggie wash according to the quantity of your produce.

Which is better? Dunking-soaking or scrubbing-rinsing? Think of it as eating food with soiled hands. Would you soak them or scrub them to remove the dirt? Scrub, of course? The same applies to fresh produce. Research has shown that scrubbing produce with a hard exterior is much more effective than dunking or soaking the produce. Use a veggie brush to wash off dirt from produce with hard surfaces like potatoes.

That being said, research has also shown that washing fresh fruits and vegetables under running water does the job as well as any veggie wash.

How To Wash Fresh Veggies & Fruits Using Simple Kitchen Supplies + Tips

There are a whole lot of simple remedies, and solutions you can make using easy kitchen ingredients that can help to clean vegetables and fruits effectively.

  • Before you start cleaning the vegetables, make sure you wash your hands with soap.
  • Apple cider vinegar and water can be used as a veggie wash that cleans as effectively.
  • Baking soda can be used instead of a veggie wash.
  • The best and most effective way (as seen during research) seems to be religiously washing it under running water and pat drying or air drying them according to their individual textures and firmness.
  • Rinse the produce BEFORE peeling and not after. Contaminants can enter the flesh of the product when you cut into an unwashed fruit or vegetable.
  • For vegetables like lettuce and cabbage, remove the outer leaves and then clean. The outer leaves have the most dirt and bacteria.
  • Use a vegetable brush to remove germs off hard-surfaced produce like cucumbers, watermelon, and potatoes.
  • Soft, leafy produce like coriander and spinach should be soaked in water and rinsed thoroughly 2-3 times and pat dried.
  • Do not soak mushrooms or delicate herbs in water. Rinse with cold water and pat dry to avoid change in texture.

As discussed, washing all fresh produce, thoroughly, under running water, or using simple home-made solutions woks very well. However, if you still feel you need store-bought washing solutions, here are some you could consider buying:

Best Veggie Washes Available Online

Veggie washes are available online through different brands. Here are some of the best veggie washes that you can buy online.

1. Dabur Veggie Wash

  • Soap-free, chemical-free, and alcohol-free.
  • No preservatives and no smell.

2. VanArc Organic Rituals Veggie & Fruit Wash

  • No preservatives.
  • No smell or aftertaste.

3. Veggie Clean by Marico

  • 100% naturally derived cleaner
  • No soap, chlorine or alcohol

4. Qraa Veggie Wash

  • Contains apple cider vinegar and citric acid.
  • Does not contain any preservative, detergent soap, chlorine, perfume, or alcohol.

5. Bubbles Natural Vegetable and Fruits Wash Liquid

  • Made with 100% food-grade ingredients
  • Leaves no after taste.

How do you wash your fresh produce? With clean water or have you used a veggie wash before? Let us know in the comment box below.

About The Author

Nishtha Asrani Sethi, born and brought up in Delhi, is a content writer who has previously worked with NDTV and Resolver. Her roots are deep within the food industry, thanks to her family business and a keen interest in contemporary food products. Nishtha loves to serve her articles with a side of humor. Her Bachelor’s degree in Home Science comes in handy while researching the science behind the food. When she is not trying to win a battle of fries vs fruit with her daughter, she is busy experimenting with her huge joint family with crazy recipes.

More Articles By This Author

Nishtha Sethi

Nishtha Asrani Sethi, born and brought up in Delhi, is a content writer who has previously worked with NDTV and Resolver. Her roots are deep within the food industry, thanks to her family business and a keen interest in contemporary food products. Nishtha loves to serve her articles with a side of humor. Her Bachelor’s degree in Home Science comes in handy while researching the science behind the food. When she is not trying to win a battle of fries vs. fruit with her daughter, she is busy experimenting with her huge joint family with crazy recipes.

Comment (1)

  • Tanvi Reply

    Have been saying this since the pandemic started, that water is ENOUGH. Just scrub it religiously

    July 28, 2020 at 8:12 pm

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